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Stanley A. Schultz

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Stanley A. Schultz

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Member since
Monday, 07 June 2010 03:09
Last online
1 year ago
  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'Re:Hello' in the forum.

    shan wrote:

    Now this is getting out of hand. Bought my 3rd T today, a stunning Pink Zebra Beauty. It has only been a month since my first - lol. So my chaco is doing well and molted today, my mexican is loving her exo terra and molted on wednesday and the PZB is busy exploring its new enclosure. Even my wife is now coming around to having spiders in the house that we do not DOOM.


    _____________________________________________________________________

    Has no one told you of the tarantula enthusiast's lament?


    "LIKE THOSE POTATO CHIPS, YOU CAN'T HAVE JUST ONE!"

    YOU'VE BEEN WARNED!
    _____________________________________________________________________
    Read More...

  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'Re:Hello hope all are well' in the forum.

    Martin Oosthuysen wrote:

    Update with a question:
    Was wondering maybe somebody could shed some light,so far 3 for 3 C. Sp. Hati Hati have molted female. Are percentages higher in some genera than others male vs female numbers ?

    You are not the first one to ask this question, especially since a lot of amateur herpetologists also keep tarantulas, and some if not many reptiles' sex ratios are influenced by incubation temperature.

    The truth is that no one knows for sure. No one has ever actually done the experiment and reported the results. And, this is particularly puzzling because the experiment would be so easy. My guess is that no one ever really took an interest in the topic.

    HERE'S A PLAN FOR ANYBODY WHO'S INTERESTED:
    1) Breed a given kind of tarantula to the point of acquiring an eggsac. I'd suggest Brachypelma albopilosum, the curlyhair tarantula. They're docile and easily handled, relatively inexpensive, and easy to breed.

    2) A few days after the eggsac is made, open it and divide the eggs among three Nefcy incubators (easy and cheap to set up).

    3) Keep one incubator at 24° C. This is the tough part. You'll need to arrange for some sort of gentle heating and/or cooling. Think about it for a while. How about a Styrofoam box rigged with a Peltier device?) The set up wouldn't be too difficult. All you'd need is one or more Peltier devices, a thermostat, maybe several, small, DC fans, and a DC power supply (e.g., battery charger). And a minimal amount of electrical expertise to hook it up properly. And, the ingenuity to ensure that it efficiently sucks heat out of the box and dumps it into the surrounding atmosphere. Piece-a-cake!

    You'll need to build three Peltier rigs and use one for each incubator.

    4) Keep another incubator at 27° C .

    5) Incubator number three needs to be kept at a constant temperature of 30° C.

    Some sort of accurate thermometers have to be used. This is really a no-brainer. You walk into your friendly, neighborhood pet shop and look at their old-fashioned, glass, aquarium thermometers. Choose three that all read the exact, same temperature. If your group is only one or two degrees different from the average of everything else on their shelf, it's okay. If you don't like those thermometers, use your favorites. We're not testing at what temperature there might be an effect, just whether or not there really is an effect over SOME temperature difference.

    And, you'd need to keep an accurate daily log and lots of photos of the breeding, the setup, the progress of the incubation, and the babies as they develop. The babies should be large enough to determine their sex within a year or 18 months of you power feed them. You can use a USB microscope to help with this job.

    [I have one of this brand and it works great. The supporting software is a huge problem, but I can help if you get back to me at the E-mail listed in my sig, below. NOTE THAT I DO NOT RESPOND TO PRIVATE MESSAGES ON THESE FORUMS. And, you'll also need to buy a decent holder for it. What they include is barely worth throwing in the trash can! Again, I can help if you get back to me at the E-mail listed in my sig, below.]

    So, you've built the Peltier rigs, incubated the eggs, now possess a whole mass of data and 500+ baby curlyhairs. What do you do now?

    1) Write up a description of what you did. (I can help proofread it for you, and offer suggestions.) Submit it to one of the major tarantula societies for publication, or publish it here by yourself.

    2) Advertise the babies for sale. Dealers will only pay you a few sheckels each for them, but they'll buy the whole hatch! If my currency converter is working properly you should be able to get R12 to R 25 each. How does a check in the mail for R 6000 to R 12000 sound? (If I'm wrong about the currency conversion, substitute your own numbers.) Other hobbyists will also buy them, but since they're more trouble to ship one or two at a time, the price takes a quantum leap. What are baby to spiderling B. albopilosum worth in S.A. now?

    Anyway, I'm probably just daydreaming, but if you can't dream you'll have no goals or aspirations to lead you.

    ____________________________________________________________________

    "Genetic power is the most awesome force the planet's ever seen, but you wield it like a kid that's found his dad's gun."

    -- Jeff Goldblum as Dr. Ian Malcolm in Jurassic Park. (Steven Spielberg, director.)
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  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'Ping' in the forum.

    Shane wrote:

    Hello there...

    It's been a while

    Nowhere near enough data! Tell us a little about yourself so we can cross-reference you in our databases. How long has it been? Are you at liberty to discuss why? What kinds of creepy-crawlies have you kept before? What kinds of creepy-crawlies are you keeping now? Show us some photos. Explain why you're keeping them the way you do.

    Yeah, I checked your profile. It's pretty near blank.! C'mon man! We need more than six words before we can welcome you back into the fold!

    :eyepoke:


    ____________________________________________________________________

    Question: What's worse than finding a poisonous spider in your tent?

    Answer: Losing a poisonous spider in your tent!
    ____________________________________________________________________

    "We ain't nermal. It's agin our religion!"
    ____________________________________________________________________

    Normal people scare me!
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  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'Hello hope all are well' in the forum.

    Martin Oosthuysen wrote:

    So this is my collection so far,yet not 100% updated and I'm getting a few more in soon. ...

    Yup! My friend, you are indeed hooked! :happy:

    _____________________________________________________________________

    Has no one told you of the tarantula enthusiast's lament?


    "LIKE THOSE POTATO CHIPS, YOU CAN'T HAVE JUST ONE!"

    But of course, YOU ALREADY KNEW THAT!
    _____________________________________________________________________

    Read More...

  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'Hello' in the forum.

    shan wrote:

    Hi all.

    I am Shan from centurion. Just got myself a G. pulchripes sling about a week ago. ...

    WELCOME TO THE HOBBY!

    WELCOME TO THIS FORUM!


    My canned newbie greeting:
    ____________________________________________________________________

    Ah, ha! Did you hear that? That was the newbie alarm! :lol:

    Please don't be offended. Tarantulas have been around for several hundreds of millions of years, and have been evolving and fine tuning their lifestyles steadily, seemingly almost forever. So, we're all playing catch-up here, and in a sense will be newbies for a long time to come.

    I strongly urge you to go to the Spiders, Calgary webtree and start reading. At least scan through the entire website, picking out topics that catch your attention, but be sure to read the following webpages. (Even experienced aficionados can sometimes benefit from a little review.)

    STAN'S NEWBIE INTRODUCTION. No! You start out with the RIGHT foot first.

    STAN'S RANT. Read as many of the books mentioned here as you can find.

    MYTH WEBTREE. How did we ever get into this mess?

    CARE SHEETS: THE MOTHER OF ALL MYTHS. How to avoid both going crazy and killing your spider at the same time.

    TEMPERATURE. You may suffer hot flashes or cold chills but your tarantula doesn't.

    RELATIVE HUMIDITY. You've been lied to!

    GROWING YOUR OWN. No, we're talking about tarantulas here, not the other "stuff."

    SUBSTRATE. Getting to the bottom of it all.

    ADDENDA AND ERRATA. Changes, additions and all the material that never made it into the printed version of TKG3.

    CARE AND HUSBANDRY OF THE CHILEAN ROSE TARANTULA. The pièce de résistance for everybody who has a Grammostola rosea. This one is necessary only if you already have a Chilean rose or are getting a rose. Otherwise it may only be interesting reading to give you a broader data base. (Also, remember that this webpage was written primarily for Northern Hemisphere enthusiasts. Keeping a Chilean rose in another Southern Hemisphere country should not pose any issues like the dreaded Hemisphere Shift.)

    The best news is that 90% of the questions you wanted to ask plus a lot, LOT more that you didn't think to ask are all laid out for you for ABSOLUTELY FREE if you read that website and take advantage of your friendly, neighborhood, public library! All you need do is read.

    Best of luck. Hope this helps.
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  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'Hi Everyone - New Here and New to T's' in the forum.

    Anthony Bond wrote:

    Welcome and enjoy

    now here is the best advise i can give you. Jake and uncle Stan will not give you this information

    the 4 ts you got from tim and mandy send them back and get out of the t game NOW
    otherwise the bank balance is always on zero. Starting with 4 ts is like taking your first shot of heroin, once you start you dont stop there is no end in site there is never enough

    so give back the ts and live a happy life.

    If you decide to keep them then all i can say is

    Welcome to the family


    WHAT HE SAID!

    :laugh: :woohoo: :happy: :drunk: :thumbsup: :tongue:
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  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'A few pointers?' in the forum.

    Kenneth wrote:

    from tuesday to thursday i was in mapungubwe national park and while staying there at the campsite i started thinking im sure this is great baboon spider habitat and did some research on a phone and came across the spider atlas and also saw all of yours guys expiditions and it had me so excited to try searching for some myself and adding them to spider atlas :D so i just wanted to ask any of you who are experienced in this for some pointers and tips?
    as im going down to kwazulu natal to a very quiet area of the elephant coast called mabibi and im sure i can find some there :D what species would i find there also?
    :spider:
    appreciate any advice you guys can give :D :eyepoke:

    THIS HAS ALMOST NOTHING AT ALL TO DO WITH YOUR EXPEDITION!

    Sorry to disappoint you.

    I just wanted to add that I wish I could come along to carry your collecting gear and point out little round holes in the dirt for you! You and I have both got to be among the luckiest guys on the planet. You're in South Africa looking for tarantulas, and I'm in south Texas (You guessed it!) looking for tarantulas.

    By New Years I'll be in the Lower Rio Grand Valley near a city called McAllen within spitting distance of the Mexican border. There are Aphonopelma anax

    [File Attachment: Aanax.jpg]

    and A. moderatum

    [File Attachment: 3-Amoderatum10.jpg]

    in the area. A little farther north we find the classic A. hentzi.

    [File Attachment: A-hentzi-010.jpg]

    This year I'm on a quest for an unusually colored widow that has been variously called a color form of Latrodectus mactans and a color form of L. hesperus. But, there's a pretty good possibility that it's an entirely new species.

    [File Attachment: HarlequinWidow-Montage-040.jpg]

    I have a suggestion. We're two people literally on opposite sides of the planet, engaged in the same pursuit. Why don't we try to keep up a dialog on this thread, comparing and contrasting our experiences and the results of our forays? We can post photos of the creatures we run into and their habitats.

    AND ALL THE REST OF YOU CAN DROOL ALL OVER
    YOUR TOUCH SCREENS AND KEYBOARDS!

    :happy: :tongue:

    ____________________________________________________________________

    "Well, I'd say your bug was pretty neat, 'cept it ain't got enough legs!"
    ____________________________________________________________________

    Question: What's worse than finding a poisonous spider in your tent?

    Answer: Losing a poisonous spider in your tent!
    ____________________________________________________________________

    Read More...

  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'Any suggestions for my A.geniculata behavior' in the forum.

    Jason wrote:

    I came back home and was checking on my T's and saw that my A.geniculata moved all his substrate to the corner as if it was looking to dig a borrow or something. Should I redo his home with a burrow or should I keep it the same ( just like levitate the substrate again) because he/she never did this behaviour since I got the T. ...

    While everybody has their own opinion on cage size, it appears to me that the cage floor is about half what it should be. A spider that size is likely to feel a bit cramped, and that may be a factor in its odd behavior.

    And, the cage is way too tall. The CIH (clear inside height) should only be about 1.5 X the DLS (diagonal leg span). In less esoteric terms, the maximum height between the top of the substrate and the top of the cage should not exceed 1-1/2 times the distance between the tip of one front leg and the tip of the rear leg on the other side when the tarantula is in a normal resting posture.

    Don't be offended, but your question leads me to suspect that you haven't had a lot of experience with tarantulas. We can fix that! Here is a canned message that I try to send out to most new tarantula keepers. Maybe you aren't a newbie, but sometimes even experienced aficionados can use a little review. Read and enjoy!

    Ah, ha! Did you hear that? That was the newbie alarm! :lol:

    Please don't be offended. Tarantulas have been around for several hundreds of millions of years, and have been evolving and fine tuning their lifestyles steadily, seemingly almost forever. So, we're all playing catch-up here, and in a sense will be newbies for a long time to come.

    I strongly urge you to go to the Spiders, Calgary webtree and start reading. At least scan through the entire website, picking out topics that catch your attention, but be sure to read the following webpages. (Even experienced aficionados can sometimes benefit from a little review.)

    STAN'S NEWBIE INTRODUCTION. No! You start out with the RIGHT foot first.

    STAN'S RANT. Read as many of the books mentioned here as you can find.

    MYTH WEBTREE. How did we ever get into this mess?

    CARE SHEETS: THE MOTHER OF ALL MYTHS. How to avoid both going crazy and killing your spider at the same time.

    TEMPERATURE. You may suffer hot flashes or cold chills but your tarantula doesn't.

    RELATIVE HUMIDITY. You've been lied to!

    GROWING YOUR OWN. No, we're talking about tarantulas here, not the other "stuff."

    SUBSTRATE. Getting to the bottom of it all.

    The best news is that 90% of the questions you wanted to ask plus a lot, LOT more that you didn't think to ask are all laid out for you for ABSOLUTELY FREE if you read that website and take advantage of your friendly, neighborhood, public library! All you need do is read.

    Best of luck. Hope this helps.

    By the way, that's one gorgeous spider! :thumbsup:
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  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'Hi Everyone - New Here and New to T's' in the forum.

    Andrew Liebenberg wrote:

    Hi All.

    My Name is Andrew, i am new here on the forum and New to Tarantulas, ...

    Ah, ha! Did you hear that? That was the newbie alarm! :happy:

    WELCOME TO THE HOBBY!

    WELCOME TO THIS FORUM!

    Please don't be offended. Tarantulas have been around for several hundreds of millions of years, and have been evolving and fine tuning their lifestyles steadily, seemingly almost forever. So, we're all playing catch-up here, and in a sense will be newbies for a long time to come.

    I strongly urge you to go to the Spiders, Calgary webtree and start reading. At least scan through the entire website, picking out topics that catch your attention, but be sure to read the following webpages. (Even experienced aficionados can sometimes benefit from a little review.)

    STAN'S NEWBIE INTRODUCTION. No! You start out with the RIGHT foot first.

    STAN'S RANT. Read as many of the books mentioned here as you can find.

    MYTH WEBTREE. How did we ever get into this mess?

    CARE SHEETS: THE MOTHER OF ALL MYTHS. How to avoid both going crazy and killing your spider at the same time.

    TEMPERATURE. You may suffer hot flashes or cold chills but your tarantula doesn't.

    RELATIVE HUMIDITY. You've been lied to!

    GROWING YOUR OWN. No, we're talking about tarantulas here, not the other "stuff."

    SUBSTRATE. Getting to the bottom of it all.

    The best news is that 90% of the questions you wanted to ask plus a lot, LOT more that you didn't think to ask are all laid out for you for ABSOLUTELY FREE if you read that website and take advantage of your friendly, neighborhood, public library! All you need do is read.

    The kinds that you've ordered are all pretty hardy and will make good starter tarantulas. But, even before they arrive start doing your homework!

    Best of luck. Hope this helps.

    ____________________________________________________________________

    YOU NEED TO BE REPROGRAMMED! Yes, this is genuinely, sincerely, profoundly correct! While you may have developed some proficiency at the proper care of aquarium fish, turtles or lizards, parakeets, gerbils, and even the family dog or cat (although there is some genuine question about who has who as a pet with these last two), you need to set all those prejudices and practices aside, and start again with a clean slate.

    -- /The Tarantula Keeper's Guide, Edition Four/, S. A. Schultz (In progress.)
    ____________________________________________________________________

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  • Dimitri Kambas thanks user 'Stanley A. Schultz' in the forum message ' Humidity with trinidad chevron'.
  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'Humidity with trinidad chevron' in the forum.

    Kenneth wrote:

    hey guys i was wondering if someone could help my 4cm trinidads container is sitting at a hummidity of about 60% and ive read they prefer 70-80% is it imperetive that i raise it and if so how should i do it?

    Thanks all :)

    Two of the most poorly understood aspects of tarantula care are temperature and humidity. Too many people from other disciplines (e.g., reptiles, birds, tropical fish) move into the arachnoculture hobby and bring their previous prejudices, hangups and presumptions with them without even so much as an attempt to examine what's been happening in the hobby for the last half century. Then they pass this "wisdom" off as fact in care sheets and "expert" postings in Internet forums.

    Worst of all, nearly all of those care sheets have not been updated SINCE THE TURN OF THE CENTURY! Think about it for a moment. There are kids out there who weren't yet born back then, but are already growing chin fuzz! LOL!

    You can save yourself a lot of trouble, expense, trauma, and even a few dead tarantulas by reading the Spiders, Calgary website. But, first read these pages:

    Humidity

    Temperature

    Care Sheets

    Myths...

    Spiders, Calgary

    And for your own good as well as the good of your tarantulas, read the books mentioned in

    Stan's Rant

    Hope this helps. Best of luck.


    ____________________________________________________________________

    Spider web: (Noun) The thing that turns you into a Karate master the instant you walk into it!
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  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'What's this?' in the forum.

    Dimitri Kambas wrote:

    Hi Stan,

    Just checked and my security logs blocked the request. I have whitelisted the ip address.

    Please try again and let me know. Sorry about that.


    Okay. It's going to have to wait a few days as I'm now in the midst of my annual Winter migration. Next transmission will be from Ft. Worth, Texas!

    Happy Holiday's y'all!

    :happy:
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  • Stanley A. Schultz created a new topic ' What's this?' in the forum.

    Only a few minutes after replying to another thread, I tried to post a reply to "Kenneth's" post #74041 and got this error message:

    _________________________________________________
    www.tarantulas.co.za -

    Access Denied
    Error code 15

    This request was blocked by the security rules
    2014-11-26 15:33:16 UTC

    Your IP184.20.6.190
    |Proxy IP192.230.66.102(ID 10208)

    Incident ID: 208000060334787975-760455510600188006

    _________________________________________________

    There are no four-letter-Anglo-Saxonisms in my reply. No off-color jokes. No politically incorrect topics discussed. I mention my book, but as an aid to a beginner, not as a sales pitch. Besides, I've done that many times before without being reprimanded or shut down. And if you really wanted me to stop, all you need do is send me an E-mail warning. Doing it this way would be rather rude. Obviously I'm not being black-listed because I'm allowed to post this thread.

    I don't suppose anybody might have an explanation for this?


    ____________________________________________________________________

    Spider web: (Noun) The thing that turns you into a Karate master the instant you walk into it!
    ____________________________________________________________________

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  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'Hello All' in the forum.

    Alistair wrote:

    Hi Guys and Ladies,

    I'm new (obviously), name is Alistair. I've been curious about getting a T for about 3 or 4 months now and just recently a friend of mine started collecting them, which has reignited my enthusiasm for the idea. ...

    I am hardly what you would call "local," although I am from the same planet (barely). But, for almost all tarantulas that's close enough.

    Much more important than where to get tarantulas is how you're going to take care of them when you do get them. Before going out and spending a ton of money on a lot of useless hardware, based on someone's harebrained concepts of tarantula care, or getting a high priced tarantula that tries to bite every time you get near, I urge you to read the entire Spiders, Calgary website. It's a lot of reading, but you have over a half billion years of evolution to catch up on. Take your time, don't try to read it all in one evening. People have reported semi-permanent brain damage from doing so.

    There are several things I need to point out, however. Firstly, that website is written primarily for northern hemisphere enthusiasts because the vast majority of them live ...(you guessed it!)... in the Northern Hemisphere. Thus, since you're on the other side of the planet, you needn't worry a lot about hemisphere shifts with Chilean roses, for instance.

    Secondly, that website and the suggestions for tarantula care are not the only ones that will work. BUT, they're the only ones that will work 99.5% percent of the time. As a newbie, follow those instructions to the letter at first, regardless of what you see on the 'Net or in other books. After you've had one or two tarantulas for a year or so you can start experimenting gently with different methods and tricks.

    Thirdly, don't try to do it all at once! Start out with only one or two especially hardy kinds and work with them for a few months. Then, if you're still interested, get another kind that's a little harder to care for or requires a different care regimen. Most of the joy of keeping tarantulas isn't owning thousands. That's just drudgery! It's the joy of getting one at a time and becoming intimately familiar with it before moving on. It's the journey that's fun, not the arrival!

    Fourthly, tarantulas are intellectual pets. Mostly, it'll just sit there and stare back at you. It's the subtle things that matter most with them, things you have to sit around and think deep thoughts about to truly understand. More often than not, what they're NOT doing is more important than what they are doing! If you need a pet that's constantly ricocheting around a cage, get a canary!

    Lastly, read as many of the books mentioned in Stan's Rant as you can lay your hands on. Those books and the Spiders, Calgary website will get you up the steepest part of the learning curve most quickly. It's after that, that the fun really starts!

    Hope this helps. Best of luck.


    ____________________________________________________________________

    *YOU NEED TO BE REPROGRAMMED!* Yes, this is really, truly, profoundly correct! While you may have developed some proficiency at the proper care of aquarium fish, turtles or lizards, parakeets, gerbils, and even the family dog or cat (although there is some genuine question about who has who as a pet with these), you need to set all those prejudices and practices aside, and start again with a clean slate.

    -- The Tarantula Keeper's Guide, Edition Four, S. A. Schultz (In process.)
    ____________________________________________________________________

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  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'Need help with taxonomic descriptions' in the forum.

    Ryno wrote:

    I've been trying to find solid taxonomic descriptions for tarantulas in general, any species, and I can't find any database online or offline. I've looked at original descriptions linked to the tarantupedia but find them difficult to manage.

    Does anyone know of a good resource where descriptions are compiled or should I keep sifting through individual articles for the information? ...

    In general, the gold standard for all spider taxonomic matters is Dr. Norman Platnick's World Spider Catalog. All spider species known to man are listed in that website. So is the reference information for all the corresponding taxonomic publications.

    Specifically, the Theraphosid tarantulas are listed HERE. All the entries are arranged alphabetically. Find the species you're interested in and look at its entry. It'll look something like this

    Aphonopelma helluo (Simon, 1891) | m | Mexico [urn:lsid:nmbe.ch:spidersp:001732]
    Eurypelma helluo Simon, 1891g: 323 (Dm).
    Delopelma helluo Petrunkevitch, 1939a: 252.
    Aphonopelma helluo Smith, 1995: 106, f. 384-392 (Tm from Eurypelma=Avicularia per Roewer).
    Aphonopelma helluo Peters, 2005b: 28, f. 75-79 (m).

    The colored links (e.g., Petrunkevitch, 1939a) are direct links to the reference that gives you the full description of the place where that paper was published (e.g., www.wsc.nmbe.ch/reference/2539).

    Once you have that reference info you have several options. You can post a query on one or more forums, asking if anyone has a copy they can photocopy and send to you. (Modern publications are most frequently sent as PDFs by E-mail.) Or, you can go to one or more of your local university libraries to look for the publication. (Note that not all university libraries possess all such publications. Call first before making a lengthy trip.) Or, if the author is still alive, you might look up their contact info and snail-mail or E-mail them for a request for a copy (usually a PDF).

    Does this sound like a lot of work and a pain in the fundament? Yup! But, it's what every graduate student has to do. It's part of the learning process.

    Ryno wrote:
    I started to research the descriptions because I got irritated by people calling species hybrids, hobby form or fake, like some saying B. sabulosum and verdezi are fake and do not exist in the hobby. Then these same people are unable to describe the differences to me and have no sources to show me. Can someone help?

    Unfortunately, for a lot of reasons I don't have time to go into, the original descriptions may not be very useful to you. But, give it a try and see what you can come up with. Get back to us with your results.

    Hope this helps.


    ____________________________________________________________________

    Question: What's worse than finding a poisonous spider in your tent?

    Answer: Losing a poisonous spider in your tent!
    ____________________________________________________________________

    Read More...

  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'Re:Need some enclosure advice' in the forum.

    Keith wrote:

    ... Yes this is the chillian rose and i have read the care sheet, i have stopped misting the glass and stopped wetting the substrate...

    For a rose the substrate needs to be absolutely dry. No moisture even underneath. This is especially true because you're supplying very little ventilation to allow the cage to dry out. They can get all the water they need from the water dish. If this isn't true in your cage you need to dismantle the cage and dry out the substrate. You can find a discussion of this in Substrate.

    Keith wrote:
    ... Ive read that if a T is on the glascdsr2.s and not on the floor its not happy? Or is this wrong?

    Read the discussion towards the end of Substrate entitled "Why does my tarantula hang from the side of the cage..."

    Keith wrote:
    ... Also i have done as much reasearch as i could on the spider.

    Beware! As clearly stated in Stan's Rant, there are no limits or controls placed on what anyone can post on the Internet. Any nincompoop can say anything they wish, in good taste or bad, truthful or otherwise. That's why I urged you to at least scan all that pages on the Spiders, Calgary website, then read as many of those four books as you can find.

    There are lots of different opinions about proper tarantula care flying around, some very good, most mediocre, a lot really bad. What's contained in those references may not be perfect or above criticism, but none of them should cause you to kill your pet spider. Read and heed! Anything different should be checked with thus group before you try it.

    Keith wrote:
    ... Being known as a "pet rock" its actually very true, the spider almost never moves untill u take her out the enclosure, ...

    A tarantula that seldom moves is either very dead or very happy. When most tarantulas start pacing around a lot you should start looking for reasons why.

    Keith wrote:
    ... But why i wonder is when i take her out and handle her ,once i put her back in the enclosure she tries to get out again...

    You've disturbed her. She's upset. She still isn't accustomed to you or the cage. Keep the cage in a dimly lit part of the room. Leave it alone. Go away. Don't bother it except to briefly check on it once a day. After a week or two of solitude you can slowly, ever-so-gently begin to touch and handle it. But, read the section on handling in the Tarantula Keeper's Guide first so you don't kill the spider. (Sorry, people, for the self-serving plug.)

    Renier has a really good idea. Give it something to hide in so it doesn't feel so ex[posed and vulnerable.

    "We all need to learn to view the world like a large fuzzy spider."

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  • Shaun Tosen thanks user 'Stanley A. Schultz' in the forum message ' Need some enclosure advice'.
  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'Need some enclosure advice' in the forum.

    We can't help you very much unless you can tell us why you have this feeling. (I have lots of feelings too. But my therapist insists it's because of an overactive imagination and possibly the drugs I'm on. LOL!) Also, you need to give us some information about the enclosure like dimensions, the size of that magical, mystical hole, and what the plant is made of. A photo would be great.

    Is this the Chilean rose, or something else? If it's the rose, did you read Care and Husbandry... as I suggested in an earlier posting? Have you read the other pages on that website? This is called doing your homework. Between that website and the four books recommended in Stan's Rant, about 99% of all the questions you can think up will be answered. Plus a lot more that you never ever thought to ask.

    Trust Uncle Stan!
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  • Stanley A. Schultz replied to the topic 'Re:A few questions on my G.rose' in the forum.

    After you read the Chilean rose care sheet back up the webtree a few branches and start reading the whole website. Or merely click this link: Spiders, Calgary.

    Hope this helps. Best of luck.
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